Seminar: How does immigration affect segregation and employment at the local level?

 Wednesday 16th May, 2-3pm, Room G19, Elmfield Building

How does immigration affect segregation and employment at the local level_Seminar

 

Professor Gwilym Pryce and Dr Dan Olner from Sheffield Methods Institute will give a seminar: “How does immigration affect segregation and employment at the local level? The interweaving roles of path dependency, cultural distance, and spatial spillovers” on Wednesday 16th May at 2pm in G19, Elmfield Building.

Abstract: Concerns about immigration tend to cluster around two key issues: (i) whether immigration exacerbates segregation and (ii) whether immigration reduces the employment prospects of indigenous works. Both these concerns tend to have a local dimension. This is in stark contrast with the empirical literatures on migration, segregation and employment which remain surprisingly distinct, and tend either to overlook the connections between these variables, or tend to look only at aggregate linkages rather than the impacts at the local level. Much of the empirical literature on segregation, for example, focuses on the geography of ethnic concentration at particular snapshots in time without considering long run dynamics or the connections with international migration. Yet, it is the dynamic interplay between segregation and migration over the long term that is likely to be the crucial driver of future residential patterns of ethnicity.  Similarly, empirical estimates of the impact of immigration on employment tend to focus on the overall macro effects, whereas public concern tends to be at the local level — whether migrants are “taking our jobs” is an anxiety arising from what’s happening in our neck of the woods, not what’s happening in the country as a whole.

In this talk, Professor Gwilym Pryce and Dr Dan Olner present an overview of two ongoing research projects that attempt to explore the local connections between immigration, segregation and employment. They argue that to understand these effects we need to understand the interweaving processes of path dependency, cultural distance, and spatial spillovers. They present the results of their research so far and invite reflection on what they mean for policy, theory and future research directions.